Monthly Archives: March 2015

  1. Michelle Berriedale-Johnson’s gardening guide for amateurs

    Michelle Berriedale-Johnson’s gardening guide for amateurs

    About Michelle Berriedale-Johnson 

    Michelle runs a site devoted to aiding those suffering from allergies - http://www.foodsmatter.com/ and also runs her own blog here. She is a self professed average Jane gardener who has achieved fantastic results.

    "I am not a professional gardener. Truth be told, I am not a very good amateur gardener either. I have never managed to work out what the PH of my soil is beyond north London clay, my cuttings rarely throw a shoot, the seeds I plant wither before they hit teenage-dom and on average, over the year, I doubt that I spend more than two hours a week gardening. Yet, somehow, I seem to have created this quite large London garden which evokes cries of ‘oh, what a wonderful garden’ from almost everyone who sees it.

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  2. Michelle Berriedale-Johnson's gardening guide for amateurs

    Michelle Berriedale-Johnson's gardening guide for amateurs

    About Michelle Berriedale-Johnson 

    Michelle runs a site devoted to aiding those suffering from allergies - http://www.foodsmatter.com/ and also runs her own blog here. She is a self professed average Jane gardener who has achieved fantastic results.

    "I am not a professional gardener. Truth be told, I am not a very good amateur gardener either. I have never managed to work out what the PH of my soil is beyond north London clay, my cuttings rarely throw a shoot, the seeds I plant wither before they hit teenage-dom and on average, over the year, I doubt that I spend more than two hours a week gardening. Yet, somehow, I seem to have created this quite large London garden which evokes cries of ‘oh, what a wonderful garden’ from almost everyone who sees it.

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  3. Why a garden shed is perfect for the upcoming heatwave

    The UK’s notoriously unpredictable climate is set to strike once again this Easter as the country prepares itself for a heatwave that could see temperatures exceed 26 degrees Celsius (80 Fahrenheit). According to some forecasts, UK temperatures could top those in Greece, Spain and North Africa as high pressure and an unusually fluctuating jet stream brings some blistering heat to the country.


    Of course, hot weather on the horizon means more time spent outside and, in particular, more time enjoying your garden. The unexpected heatwave will provide a great opportunity to invite friends and family over for garden parties and so it’s important that your garden is looking its best, and that includes your shed.


    The humble shed is a great British institution and provides both a practical and aesthetic boost to your garden. 

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  4. A guide to growing 9 popular spring vegetables

    A guide to growing 9 popular spring vegetables

    Spring is arriving and that means it is time to begin preparing for the planting of the spring vegetables. The process of growing vegetables can begin early with the sowing of seeds for both the spring and summer food harvests. At the least, the process can be started with thoughts of what may be planted when the soil is finally thawed and ready for sowing. This is the time for planning and for projects; spring is all about new beginnings and new births. To make the best of the birth of new spring vegetables, read the following advice:

    Prepare the soil

    Springtime is perfect for preparing soil for growing vegetables. This is the time to be adding organic matter such as compost, well-aged manure and worm castings to the soil. It is also a good time to clean up debris left from the winter and to cut away diseased or broken branches. Get the garden shed organised and ready whilst also checking the condition of sprinklers and other tools.

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  5. A guide to planting bare-root trees

    Planting bare-root trees is a process that must be done correctly; it is not that difficult, but is one that needs to be done in such a way to give the tree the best start in its new location. For those who do not know, bare-root trees are plants that are dug up from the ground during their dormant stage, which is typically in autumn. The roots of these bare-root trees are shaken free from soil and then kept cool and packed in a moist material like damp sawdust. This makes bare-root plants easy to store and ship in good condition.

    Bare-root trees can actually be ordered for shipment in either autumn or early spring from mail order nurseries. These types of nurseries generally have a wider selection of trees than local nurseries and the costs of bare-root trees can be one-third to one-half of the price of equivalent container-grown trees. Though purchasing high quality plant stock does account for good growth of these bare-root trees, they require proper care upon arrival, ap

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